Worshippers at the organic-only food altar have been claiming for years, despite bushels of evidence to the contrary, that their precious “natural” fruits, veggies, and meat are healthier than “normal” crops. (You know, inorganic food.) But BBC News reports on a landmark scientific review published today, which was commissioned by the UK’s Food Standards Agency.  Get ready for the great debunking:

Overall the report … found no differences in most nutrients in organically or conventionally grown crops, including in vitamin C, calcium, and iron.  The same was true for studies looking at meat, dairy and eggs.

As we have discussed before, words like “natural” and “organic” have simply become part of a new labeling craze that doesn’t say much about the quality or safety of food itself. Even the U.S. Department of Agriculture concedes that its organic label is just a “marketing program”—mainly specifying how food is processed, and says nothing about food safety or nutrition.
This latest report should go a long way toward leveling the growing mountain of organic myths: that organic is sustainable, that organic is good for the environment, that it has more nutrients … you get the picture. Keep it in mind next time you’re tempted to reach for that six-dollar heirloom tomato.