We’ve long agreed with former British MP Lord Taverne, who called environmentalist opposition to genetically modified food crops “not rational.” Greenpeace activists took irrational anti-biotechnology ideology to a whole different level this week by destroying an experimental crop of genetically modified wheat in Australia.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise. Greenpeace co-founder Patrick Moore left the group years ago, citing the group’s turn toward fringe beliefs. As he puts it: “I became a sensible environmentalist; Greenpeace became increasingly senseless as it adopted an agenda that is anti-science, anti-business, and downright anti-human.”

The original Greenpeacers, like Patrick Moore, founded an organization with a “vision of a green and peaceful future.” Moore later described the group as “a band of scientific illiterates who use Gestapo tactics.” No kidding.

This eco-vandalism could have serious consequences if left unanswered. The genetically improved wheat crops that Greenpeace activists destroyed were designed to be more nutritious, with higher fiber content and a lower glycemic index. Biotechnology has the potential to help farmers (especially in the Third World) by providing drought-resistant and higher-yield crops. And despite the hyperbolic scare tactics of Greenpeace and its “precautionary principle”-wielding allies, there have been no documented negative health effects from genetically modified foodcrops.

Destroying experimental crops seems no different from Animal Liberation Front activists breaking into a research laboratory to act on their own twisted agenda. It’s scientific sabotage. Frankly, we’re surprised that the Australian government still allows Greenpeace to continue operating. Maybe all the government needs is an agricultural version of the Animal Enterprise Protection Act.