There may already be overwhelming scientific evidence the health benefits from eating fish (all those omega-3s) outweigh the concerns about minor mercury exposure (the EPA’s Reference Dose includes a ten-fold safety cushion against levels of mercury consumption that will cause possible health risks), but scientists at the University of Montreal have found even more reasons not to worry.

The scientists investigated what effects cooking fish and consuming coffee or tea at the same time as eating fish had on mercury exposure. They found that broiling or frying fish such as tuna and mackerel reduced mercury exposure by 40 to 60 percent, and that drinking coffee or tea while eating raw fish reduced exposure by 50 to 60 percent. The two methods together (for cooked fish) essentially eliminated exposure to mercury.

So what’s the word from the professional fear industry? So far we haven’t seen any response from PCRM or Greenpeace, who scaremonger about mercury in fish to push their respective animal-rights and fringe-environmental agendas.

Harvard scientists found that eating fish reduced individuals’ risk of premature death from coronary heart disease by 17 percent. Eating fish during pregnancy also shows benefits: one Lancet study showed that children born to mothers who ate no fish during pregnancy were 29 percent more likely to have low IQs and a Harvard study found that women who ate the most fish (even oft-falsely-maligned canned tuna) during pregnancy were more likely to score well on cognitive tests at age three.

Scientists have already shown that the selenium in fish (an essential nutrient) can protect against hypothetical mercury exposure. Now they’ve found that having a cup of tea with your favorite sushi can further reduce this hypothetical risk. It’s past time for the FDA and EPA to rethink their advisory about fish consumption.

Note: This article was updated to correct a misinterpretation associated with translating an article in English.