Yesterday’s Washington Post was an anti-soft-drink feeding frenzy (see our February 27 headlines). Today’s Post follows up with an anti-fast-food feature about journalist Eric Schlosser, the nanny culture’s current man of the hour.

Schlosser’s first book, Fast Food Nation, is a compendium of anecdotes about the supposed horrors of the all-American fast-food meal. He’s been getting a free pass from a host of newspaper and TV interviewers, who seem generally pleased to let him have a free swing at those of us who enjoy a cheeseburger, fries, and soda.

More shocking, though is the company he’s been keeping. Our research indicates that during the last two weeks of January Schlosser appeared on over 50 television broadcasts, and was accompanied each time by Neal Barnard, the spokesperson for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM).

Make no mistake abour this: PCRM is a virulent animal rights organization masquerading as a medical- and health-issues group. Neal Barnard’s stock message is anti-meat and anti-dairy. His appearance with Schlosser points to the larger agenda driving Fast Food Nation.

Schlosser, a self-styled 21st-century Upton Sinclair, seems bent on convincing Americans that fast food should be avoided like the plague. He is the latest example of an activist culture that claims to “know what’s best” for the rest of us. Don’t believe a word of it. Read about the Center For Consumer Freedom’s efforts to expose the war on meat in the United States, and look for a complete run-down on Schlosser’s agenda (and his partners in nannying) in the next Center For Consumer Freedom newsletter