We can say again and again that genetically improved foods help feed the world’s hungry. But today, we’ll let those who desperately need the help speak for themselves. Kenyan plant pathologist Florence Wambugu made the case for biotech in the Sunday Los Angeles Times:



“They can buy their food in supermarkets… They can choose the more expensive organic foods, or even imported foods. They can eat fresh, frozen or canned produce. Then, from their world of plenty, they tell us what we can and cannot feed our children. The ‘they’ I refer to are a variety of anti-biotechnology protesters who would deny developing countries like my home, Kenya, the resources to develop a technology that can help alleviate hunger, malnutrition and poverty. Genetic engineering of plants has sparked a revolution in agriculture, one that can play an important role in feeding the world’s hungry.



“The protesters have fanned the flames of mistrust of genetically modified foods through a campaign of misinformation. These people and organizations have become adept at playing on the media’s appetite for controversy to draw attention to their cause. But the real victim in this controversy is the truth.”