Get thee behind me, bacon! PETA has released a new pamphlet titled “Christianity and Vegetarianism” that argues giving up meat is a holy act. Says one PETA member, “to be the best Christian, you need to be a vegetarian.” Another says just because eating meat is “not on the magic list of sins doesn’t make it right to do.” It’s clear the Gospel According to PETA doesn’t contain the Old Testament — some PETA apostles even shun “milk and honey.” Scoffs one Roman Catholic official: “There are going to be people who see this and say ‘If I’m a vegetarian I’m a better person. I don’t remember ‘Blessed are all the salad eaters.'”

It may sound silly, but it’s just the latest example of PETA’s two-faced agenda. “PETA’s perspective of what it means to be human is to make compassionate choices, rather than cruel choices,” says PETA’s Bruce Friedrich — the fellow who said “it would be a great thing if… all of these fast-food outlets and these slaughterhouses and these laboratories and these banks that fund them exploded tomorrow” [click here to hear him yourself], and suggested that an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the U.S. would be a good thing.

And just last week, PETA pulled a television ad that “shows a fur-clad woman getting clubbed to death.” A “compassionate choice”? Hardly. The group is publicly promoting that fact that you can still see it on a PETA website. Says PETA’s Ingrid Newkirk: “Although the ad effectively drives home the point… people are no longer inured to horrific images.”