If you enjoyed a bit of caviar on New Year’s Eve, you’re a bad, bad person. That’s the message SeaWeb is sending.



Says SeaWeb’s executive director, Vikki Spruill, “It is really in bad taste to be eating anything that is in such severe environmental decline.” SeaWeb and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) say beluga sturgeon caviar is endangered, and are alarmed by the fact that consumer appetite for caviar is on the rise, and warn, “Let the connoisseur beware.”



And let the consumer beware, too. SeaWeb’s been down this stream before, with its discredited “Give Swordfish A Break!” campaign, which was based on the myth that Atlantic swordfish were being over-fished to the point of extinction. According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, that simply wasn’t true. SeaWeb is now at the center of the set of strange bedfellows that make up EcoFish, a company that hawks activist-approved seafood that can cost consumers up to 20 percent more than a traditional catch. Is this new effort really just “Give Sturgeon A Break”? (There’s much more about SeaWeb, Spruill, and NRDC — and their sources of funding — at ActivistCash.com.)



PETA is also bullying those who enjoy seafood, going after fishermen in Missouri in an effort to ban fishing in state parks there. Missouri is just the latest state to be targeted in PETA’s “Fishing Hurts” campaign to tell taxpayers what they can and can’t do in the parks they pay for.