“I think people should use their common sense. Any food is reasonable; just don’t eat too much of it.”



Sound advice. But here’s what’s surprising: It’s coming from one of the top nags in the anti-consumer movement, Marion Nestle. Speaking on CBS during a report on the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine’s anti-milk smear campaign, the usually hysterical Nestle offered the rational advice.



Nestle, after all, has made a career of deciding what’s best for you:



She’s worked with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) on recommendations for mandatory menu labeling of fat and calorie content, releasing a skewed report on obesity endorsing the infamous “Twinkie tax.”
As part of that effort, she’s called for “taxing soft drinks and other high-calorie junk foods” and campaigned for federal price controls to make snack foods more expensive.
And, in a direct attack on consumer freedom, she’s said restaurants should give customers less for their money, blaming “the huge increase in portion sizes at restaurants” for obesity.



For someone as deeply entrenched in the anti-consumer movement as Nestle to now concede that “any food is reasonable” is a victory for consumer freedom indeed.