The U.S. government has said time and again that organic foods have no added health benefits. Organic marketers hawk their products by trash-talking traditional production, but it turns out their own wares may actually be dangerous. According to Scripps Howard News Service, pathogens such as E. coli, shigella and salmonella “can be transferred to leafy greens, strawberries and root vegetables” grown through organic methods — that is, grown in animal manure.



They “look so good and nutritious,” but “appearances are deceptive” — manure growing can pose a danger to consumers. Even the Center for Science in the Public Interest says that such produce contamination caused over 10,000 cases of illness in the U.S. in the past decade. While organic marketers say they are working to stop contamination, North Carolina State University microbiologist Lee-Ann Jaykus says “stopping all pathogens at the production level is not possible at this time.”



According to the University of Houston’s Dr. Thomas DeGregori, manure used in organic fertilization “may harbor toxic chemicals, viruses, harmful bacteria, insects, worms, or other pests.” Still sound tasty?