Because of preliminary research findings in a Swedish study on acrylamide claiming the carcinogen occurs in foods ranging from bread to potato chips, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has called on consumers to radically alter their diets. But scientists “have consistently concluded that they do not recommend changes to either diet or processing methods based on recent scientific findings.” Further, “these findings were based on an analytical method that has yet to be validated,” according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.



In fact, the lead researcher of the study, along with Swedish, British and World Health Organization officials, has urged consumers not to make any dietary changes based on the preliminary report. “It’s not more dangerous to eat these foods today than it was a year before,” says Busk. “There is no reason to be alarmed or to drastically change your eating habits.”



As The Washington Post wrote when the study was released: “Are you about to tell me not to take preliminary scientific information out of context — and remind me that it’s far more important to eat a wide variety of foods and not think any of them is magically beneficial or inherently malevolent? Why, yes.”