In the latest organized campaign to scare the bejeezus out of American consumers, a coalition of anti-technology activist groups, is organizing a boycott against fish that have been improved through biotechnology. The Associated Press reported yesterday that the crusade against better fish is being led by:

The Center for Food Safety (CFS) — a front group for the organic and “natural” foods industry;

Friends of the Earth — a long-time opponent of scientific progress; and

Clean Water Action — a leftist group that recently teamed up with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr’s Water Keeper Alliance. Kennedy, who is trying to sue American hog farmers out of existence, has suggested that those who raise pigs are “a greater threat than Osama bin Laden.”

CFS, whose organic food-industry contributions are paying for this smear campaign, has convinced 210 restaurants, seafood distributors, and grocers to eliminate all genetically-altered fish from their supply chains. But this is a curious “victory,” considering that no such product is even on the market yet.

Elliot Entis, the president of one enterprising company that’s trying to change this, told The New York Times yesterday that activist groups aren’t really trying to keep the food supply safe. “Their private agenda,” said Entis, “is to raise money for the organizations and misuse information to incite fears.”

Most of the restaurants volunteering for this biotech fish ban are captained by members of Chefs Collaborative, a “progressive” nonprofit that preaches strict adherence to organic-only menus in an attempt to permanently “change the way people make their food choices.” And aside from small, mom-and-pop retailers, the only sizable grocery company to sign on is, predictably, Whole Foods Market. This retailer already has a long history of backing environmental scare campaigns like the recent hysteria over Acrylamide in starchy foods.

In this morning’s Wall Street Journal, columnist Collin Levy observes that this latest techno-phobic movement is being pushed “by the same fraidy-cats who recently convinced Zambia it would rather starve than eat biotech.” Describing an earlier collaboration of the same activist players, Levy notes that “even their most famous scare campaign, accusing biotech corn of perpetrating the mass slaughter of the monarch butterfly, was ultimately squashed. The EPA admitted last year that the concern was bogus from the beginning; the corn posed no health to man, plant, or butterfly.”