More good news for those of us who are convinced that genetically improved foods are an important part of our future. The International Food Information Council (IFIC) has released survey numbers from last month showing that a whopping 71 percent of Americans say they “would be likely to buy produce that had been enhanced through biotechnology.” The survey also found that 61 percent of us “expect to benefit” personally from such foods.

And according to the Associated Press, the farm belt will come out a winner as well. A separate study released on Monday by the National Center for Food & Agricultural Policy found that farmers in Kansas and Missouri can expect to “significantly bolster their income” by growing biotech varieties.

In the face of this great news, food technology’s enemies are still banging the drum of 1950s agriculture. Percy Schmeiser, who has been found guilty in a Canadian court of stealing biotech seed from Monsanto, appeared Monday at the University of Missouri-Columbia, claiming that “there is no safe distance” from GMO grains.

Schmeiser’s speech was sponsored by the U.S. Green Party, whose political representatives came clean about something we’ve been saying all along. Green Party U.S. House candidate Keith Brekus told Schmeiser’s crowd that the fight against food technology is really “a struggle over corporate domination.”

Elsewhere, activists continue to fight against the “corporate” interests that want to feed the Third World. Impatient with Zambia’s continued foot-dragging on a GMO-heavy U.S. food aid package, The Detroit Free Press is asking why that country’s dictator would “worry about future trade economics when present needs are so severe.”

“Never mind,” says the Free Press, “that it’s the same stuff that 280 million Americans and 30 million Canadians eat.”