Listen carefully when you hear professor [Richard] Daynard and his trial lawyer friends talk about fat deposits,” cautions Center for Consumer Freedom Executive Director Rick Berman in a Boston Herald op-ed. “They’re really referring to their bank accounts, not your love handles.”

Amusingly, Daynard, the organizer of this weekend’s food-company lawsuit summit, now insists: “we’re not doing this to make trial lawyers rich, that’s for sure.” He should tell that to legal shark John Banzhaf, who says: “the very fact that lawyers are going to be making money out of [suing restaurants] is exactly what we’re counting on, ’cause that’s what made it with tobacco.”

More news from the land of lawyers who want to control what you eat: Banzhaf vowed in Boston to sue school boards, suggested that doctors should be held liable when their patients are overweight, and denied that obesity is an individual problem. Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest argued that fixing the nation’s weight problem is “going to take a whole lot of lawsuits.” And the chief attorney for the grossly misnamed Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (an animal-rights front group) claims the conference provided new ammunition for her ridiculous lawsuit trying to remove the “heart healthy” label from chicken.

But there is some good news to report. The Financial Times noted on Sunday that the Center for Consumer Freedom will soon launch a national television ad campaign ridiculing obesity lawsuits. “The advertisement,” FT reports, “shows a lawyer haranguing an unseen defendant for making products that carried no warning label. The defendant turns out to be a girl guide with home-baked cookies.”

We’re not one to quibble with such on-the-nose reporting. Look for that ad starting any day now. And if you haven’t yet acquainted yourself with our other groundbreaking ad campaigns, we invite you to visit our media gallery.