In the shadowy world of animal-rights and environmental terrorism, convicted arsonist and PETA grantee Rodney Coronado is nothing short of a hero. He is regularly interviewed by terrorist-supporting publications. His speeches draw hundreds of impressionable young listeners. And the mainstream media treats him as a spokesperson for the Earth Liberation Front (ELF) and Animal Liberation Front (ALF). Sadly, where Coronado leads, others follow.

Along with ALF and ELF, Coronado claims to support only property destruction, not attacks on people. But now he has openly endorsed the “Revolutionary Cells,” whose bombings clearly targeted people, not just inanimate objects. In the recent issue of the ALF publication No Compromise, Coronado wrote:

Now is the time to ready ourselves for war. It’s not enough to defend; we must confront the real terrorists when they least expect it, in traditional guerrilla warfare fashion … let’s not let our warriors in the A.L.F., E.L.F., Revolutionary Cells and other groups down.

Revolutionary Cells has admitted its guilt in two incidents. In August, the group left two bombs — including a “secondary device,” timed to go off when fire and rescue workers were on the scene — at a targeted firm. “If the first responders would have arrived minutes earlier, people would have been killed,” said an FBI spokesperson. In September, the group set off a ten-pound nail bomb outside another targeted company.

Revolutionary Cells’ statement told employees: “You never know when your house, your car even, might go boom. Who knows, that new car in the parking lot may be packed with explosives. Or maybe it will be a shot in the dark … all customers and their families are considered legitimate targets.”

This is what Rodney Coronado is now endorsing. And don’t forget: PETA president Ingrid Newkirk calls Coronado “a fine young man.”

Revolutionary Cells appears to be the work of just one person: Daniel Andreas San Diego, who is now an FBI-wanted fugitive — just like Coronado once was. But don’t chalk up Coronado’s statement to a misplaced sense of fugitive fraternity. This wasn’t the first time he has encouraged violence against people. Speaking at an auditorium full of young people in January 2003, Coronado argued: “I think [food producers] should appreciate that we’re only targeting their property. Because frankly I think it’s time to start targeting them.”