Tomorrow’s vote on Measure H in Mendocino County, CA will determine if the same locality that voted to legalize marijuana farming four years ago will now outlaw the farming of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Is it something in the pot-laced air? No — just organic food activists blowing smoke in an attempt to protect their market share. Measure H is curious, not only because it would ban an agricultural activity that doesn’t yet exist in Mendocino, but also because its enforcement could present a financial burden to the county. Of course, none of this matters to the holier-than-thou pontiffs of the organic food movement.

One cheerleader and fundraiser for the Measure H campaign is Lori Rosenberg, who runs a Mendocino natural-foods “cooperative.” Rosenberg told The Boston Globe that she doesn’t “want her foods to be messed with.” Or her profits — especially considering that organic food products are more expensive than their conventional counterparts and provide no unique benefits. Finding it difficult to compete, organic activists often seek to rub out the competition.

Els Cooperrider, another Measure H activist, asks: “What could be so bad to saying ‘No to GMOs’ until we learn a little more about them?” The answer is nothing — if you happen to run an organically certified brewpub in Mendocino as Cooperrider does. With no scientific evidence of any problems associated with genetically modified foods, holistic food activists are left to
scare the public
with a never-ending litany of “what if” scenarios.

Americans have been safely been enjoying genetically modified food in great quantities for almost a decade. Moreover, biotech food has the potential to save millions of lives claimed by starvation every year. Of course, none of this matters to the chic, organic elitists of Mendocino County.

The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat isn’t fooled by organic scare-mongers. It urges Mendocino citizens to vote “no” on Measure H: “Fear is a powerful motivator. It can lead to both great achievements and to tragic decisions. It can also lead to poorly written and misguided public policy, as in the case of Measure H.”