A Hampton Roads, Virginia television station is reporting that “North Carolina officials may consider more charges” against two People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) employees who currently face 31 counts each of felony animal cruelty. Just weeks after we exposed the skeletons in PETA’s closet — that it has killed more than 12,400 animals at its headquarters — police arrested the PETA workers for tossing animal corpses in a dumpster behind a Piggly Wiggly grocery store in Ahoskie, North Carolina. Now, WAVY-10 reports, police are “trying to figure out if the animals in the case were euthanized. If so, it could mean more problems for PETA.”

The station noted that if the cause of death is euthanasia, “then two PETA employees have a problem because according to [Ahoskie police detective Jeremy] Roberts, ‘they were basically practicing veterinary medicine without a license,’ which is against North Carolina state law.”

The evidence suggests euthanasia was indeed the cause of the animals’ deaths. WAVY-10 reports, “PETA has been very open about its work in North Carolina. Its programs include euthanizing animals it considers to be unadoptable.” However, Ahoskie veterinarian Patrick Proctor called at least two of the animals “very adoptable” kittens.

It’s possible that police investigations may turn up even more instances of PETA crimes.
The Roanoke-Chowan News-Herald, which serves North Carolina, recently reported that the property manager of the shopping mall where the PETA employees were arrested “remembers approximately nine instances over an 18-month period where dead animals have been found in commercial dumpsters located on the properties his company manages.” He noted the distinct similarities to the instance in which police caught the PETA pair:

In each case, [he] alleges the same type of garbage bags were found with the dead animals inside. He also pointed to the day of the week (Wednesday) in which these dead animals were allegedly dumped.

The PETA employees were caught allegedly dumping the carcasses on Wednesday, June 15, after other dead animals — enclosed in plastic bags — were found dumped in the same spot on at least three preceding Wednesdays.