As the list of city and state officials eager to tell us what to eat continues to grow, the bandwagon of would-be trans fat bans now stretches to places like Oakland County (Michigan), Portland, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut.But many constituents and even health officials do not share their representatives’ enthusiasm. Thomas Gordan, director of Oakland County’s Health and Human Services department, opposes a trans fat ban in his county: "Is trans fat good for you? No. Is smoking good for you? No. But they’re not illegal, and people in this country still get to make up their own minds about issues like that."In an effort to kick ’em while they’re down, researchers continue to churn out more studies on the alleged evils of trans fats. While these never-ending reports certainly aren’t lacking quantity, even notorious food scold Marion Nestle questions their quality. Speaking recently to CBS News, Nestle responded to the claim by the Harvard School of Public Health that trans fat consumption is linked with infertility:

If you look at their raw data, it just didn’t show an increase in risk … And even when the adjustments were made, the numbers were still very small … I am always skeptical when I hear the claim that a particular food or food component has a very large impact on health.