Over the years, we’ve heightened public awareness of the serious shortcomings of countless food cop claims. And now the BBC is joining our chorus. Responding to a recent government report forecasting future problems from obesity (such as shrinking lifespans), BBC investigators determined: “There’s just one problem with this claim — official forecasts show it’s not true.”
While many people seem flabbergasted at the notion that unscrupulous health activists simply make up “facts” to support their positions, we’re are all too familiar with this ugly truth. And we’re determined to set the record straight. In fact, we offered the public some actual obesity facts on Friday in a provocative Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed: 

A quick inventory of our homes and offices provides more insight into our weight woes than any nutrition survey. Elevators in almost every building enable tenants to avoid climbing any stairs. Moving sidewalks in airports help travelers make their connections without breaking a sweat. And TV sets in 99 percent of U.S. households ensure that time between work and sleep can be spent comfortably on the sofa …
Obesity is a trade-off between conveniences of modern life and metabolisms inherited from our great-grandparents
Ultimately, it boils down to this: Would we rather minimize our body weight or maximize our comfort and convenience?