We’ve told you over the years that the American Medical Association (which speaks for the vast majority of American physicians) doesn’t have a very high opinion of PCRM — the misnamed Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (which speaks for the animal rights world). The latest shoe to drop is a new resolution condemning PCRM, which was debated during last summer’s annual AMA meeting in Chicago. It represents the opinion of the American Academy of Neurology, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.
In the coming weeks, we’ll be sending copies to reporters, members of Congress, Hollywood publicists, and the people in TV and radio who decide which “Public Service Announcements” get on the air.
It reads, in part:

Whereas, PCRM has engaged in a multi-year crusade against the March of Dimes including protests directed at March walkers, volunteers, and donors; and
Whereas, PCRM discourages donations to health charities that support research with animals, like the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the American Foundation for AIDS Research, the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation and the American Red Cross; and
Whereas, PCRM represents itself as a physician’s group with fewer than five percent physician members; and
Whereas, The AMA reiterated its strong support for advocacy of animal research at the 2006 Annual Meeting; therefore be it
RESOLVED, That our AMA strongly object to the positions of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) that denounce animal research; and be it further
RESOLVED, That our AMA condemn these ongoing activities of the PCRM that impede humane and responsible animal research.

The neurologists’ groups hit the nail on the head, especially by noting how few actual physicians make up this phony “physicians committee” (the latest numbers indicate that it’s now less than four percent).
We can’t wait to hear PCRM’s feeble explanation for how the mainstream medical profession is misinterpreting its work to save lab rats and guinea pigs at the expense of people. But the bottom line is this: Why should a group of animal activists who don’t care about your survival have any say in what you eat (or what you feed your children)?
You guessed it. They shouldn’t.
Bonus reading material: “7 Things You Didn’t Know” about PCRM, and a whole website devoted to exposing its brand of PETA-approved quackery.
NOTE: This article was edited to correct an error.