Every now and then, an animal rights activist will toss aside all pretenses to common sense and make a truly inane (and frighteningly candid) statement. Today’s case in point: Dr. Jerry Vlasak, a part-time trauma surgeon who was at one time a spokesperson for the PETA-linked “Physicians Committee” for Responsible Medicine (PCRM). He’s also been affiliated with the pseudo-pirate Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and a public defender of the terrorist Animal Liberation Front. When asked recently about whether we should take steps to eliminate mosquitoes, Vlasak spouted off with a radical anti-people solution. As Wesley J. Smith reports on his blog:

“They would have us believe it’s either the mosquitoes or us. That’s just not the case. For one thing, there are way too many people on the planet,” Vlasak said. Vlasak said more attention should be focused on the problems of overpopulation instead. “One of the problems is, they send 1 million pounds of food to Somalia and all they do is reproduce and pretty soon there’s going to be more people suffering there. China is sort of an example where they were able to stabilize the population with governmental standards,” Vlasak said.

Get that? Instead of swatting or spraying an annoying insect, we should let poor Somalians starve, since giving them food to live will just result in them having kids. Or maybe Chinese-style population control could work.

Right.

This is nothing new from Vlasak. At the “Animal Rights 2003” conference, Vlasak (as a representative of PCRM) endorsed the murder of physicians whose medical research work requires the use of lab rats. (PCRM has denied that Vlasak was speaking on its behalf, but the event’s program described him as “Jerry Vlasak, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.”)

Vlasak stated:

I don’t think you’d have to kill — assassinate — too many vivisectors before you would see a marked decrease in the amount of vivisection going on. And I think for 5 lives, 10 lives, 15 human lives, we could save a million, 2 million, 10 million non-human lives.

Unfortunately, Vlasak is not alone in his bizarre, anti-human thinking. Accompanied by violence or not, the idea that there’s nothing special about people is increasingly common in the animal rights movement. It seems that when people are the problem, no “solution” is ever enough.