Food & Beverage (page 199)

We Told You Kids Wouldn’t Eat It

Last year, Center For Consumer Freedom voiced skepticism about Berkeley, California's school district scheme to serve students only organic, pesticide-free, politically correct fare. Now, not surprisingly to us, Restaurants and Institutions magazine is reporting that since starting the all-organic program, participation levels among kids eligible for free or reduced-cost meals has plunged 50% for breakfast and 30% for lunch. ("Food, news & people," Restaurants and Institutions, 3/15/00.)
Posted March 10, 2000 at 12:00 am

Fat Hits The Fan

The Center for Science in the Public Interest’s Michael F. Jacobson has collaborated with fellow nanny Dr. Marion Nestle of New York University to spell out a battle plan to…
Posted March 9, 2000 at 12:00 am

More Popular Seafood Targeted By Activists

Following on the heels of the fact-less "Give Swordfish A Break" media campaign, some activists are now trying to get the public to stop eating tuna, shrimp, salmon, pollock and more. These anti-choice activists are producing "information" guides they hope will alter consumer-eating habits to align with their political agenda.
Posted March 7, 2000 at 12:00 am

Demands For New Fat Taxes Grow Louder

Seizing upon recent headlines declaring an obesity "epidemic," the Worldwatch Institute issued a plan on how to modify American eating patterns. The plan is, in their own words "modeled on the successful campaign to discourage smoking." The report joins Kelly Brownell of Yale University and others in calling for new taxes on fast foods, warning labels for "high fat" and "high sodium" packages foods and more regulation of food advertising."
Posted March 3, 2000 at 12:00 am

Who Says You’re Too Fat?

A new study in the March issue of American Journal of Public Health challenges some of the scarier rhetoric put forth by nannies promoting the so-called obesity epidemic. According to the researchers, people with body mass indexes between 25 and 29, who the nannies have described as dangerously overweight, are at no greater risk for early mortality. In fact, they report such people may suffer needlessly from stigmatization.
Posted March 3, 2000 at 12:00 am

Tarnishing The Organic Halo

The Columbus Dispatch questions nannies' baseless claims about the benefits of organic foods, pointing out that even the head of the Organic Trade Association recently had to admit that organic foods "are not safer or more nutritious than other foods."
Posted March 2, 2000 at 12:00 am

Restaurants Get ‘Large Portion’ Of Blame For Obesity

Reporting on the growing number of overweight Americans, Toyko's leading newspaper points "to the ever-increasing size of the portions served at restaurants as silent testimony to the fact that Americans are eating more than they need." Stateside, the Christian Science Monitor's look at fighting obesity with fad diets sideswipes the restaurant industry: "In recent years, portion sizes in restaurants have increased dramatically, but for what useful purpose?"
Posted March 1, 2000 at 12:00 am

The Campaign Continues

The nannies' campaign to link obesity to restaurant portion sizes gets another plug (the fifth one this week), this time in the Providence Journal-Bulletin. "Some of the extra calories we're taking in probably come from eating out," writes reporter Linda Sevelia. Why? "Portions of many popular restaurant items have grown many-fold."
Posted March 1, 2000 at 12:00 am

Editorials Spread Center For Consumer Freedom’s Message

From deploring Kelly Brownell's fat tax to attacking CSPI's call for lawsuits against restaurants, two recent editorials in Charleston's Post and Courier and the Cincinnati Enquirer apparently draw upon Consumer Freedom research to take on the food police. ("The calorie cops demand a Twinkie tax," The Cincinnati Enquirer, 2/26/00.)
Posted February 28, 2000 at 12:00 am

A Prescription For Behavior Modification

In a USDA forum, diet book author Barry Sears said, "We need to view food as a potential drug…as Americans are the fattest we have ever been." Could this be a harbinger of public policy to come?
Posted February 24, 2000 at 12:00 am