Snacks (page 30)

Who Says You’re Too Fat?

A new study in the March issue of American Journal of Public Health challenges some of the scarier rhetoric put forth by nannies promoting the so-called obesity epidemic. According to the researchers, people with body mass indexes between 25 and 29, who the nannies have described as dangerously overweight, are at no greater risk for early mortality. In fact, they report such people may suffer needlessly from stigmatization.
Posted March 3, 2000 at 12:00 am

The Campaign Continues

The nannies' campaign to link obesity to restaurant portion sizes gets another plug (the fifth one this week), this time in the Providence Journal-Bulletin. "Some of the extra calories we're taking in probably come from eating out," writes reporter Linda Sevelia. Why? "Portions of many popular restaurant items have grown many-fold."
Posted March 1, 2000 at 12:00 am

Restaurants Get ‘Large Portion’ Of Blame For Obesity

Reporting on the growing number of overweight Americans, Toyko's leading newspaper points "to the ever-increasing size of the portions served at restaurants as silent testimony to the fact that Americans are eating more than they need." Stateside, the Christian Science Monitor's look at fighting obesity with fad diets sideswipes the restaurant industry: "In recent years, portion sizes in restaurants have increased dramatically, but for what useful purpose?"
Posted March 1, 2000 at 12:00 am

Editorials Spread Center For Consumer Freedom’s Message

From deploring Kelly Brownell's fat tax to attacking CSPI's call for lawsuits against restaurants, two recent editorials in Charleston's Post and Courier and the Cincinnati Enquirer apparently draw upon Consumer Freedom research to take on the food police. ("The calorie cops demand a Twinkie tax," The Cincinnati Enquirer, 2/26/00.)
Posted February 28, 2000 at 12:00 am

A Prescription For Behavior Modification

In a USDA forum, diet book author Barry Sears said, "We need to view food as a potential drug…as Americans are the fattest we have ever been." Could this be a harbinger of public policy to come?
Posted February 24, 2000 at 12:00 am

CSPI’s New Call For Twinkie Taxes

Claiming "the U.S. has become a hothouse for obesity," the Center for Science in the Public Interest's (CSPI) Michael Jacobson is pushing for new taxes on snack food and calorie listings on menus. ("Obesity in America," Nutrition Action Healthletter, March 2000.)
Posted February 23, 2000 at 12:00 am

Nanny Influences On Student Journalism

Thirty years ago, student newspapers were filled with warnings against racism and Vietnam. Today, the University of Texas-Arlington school paper is going out of its way (and out of the bounds of reality) to warn students that the restaurant foods they like to eat are killing them.
Posted February 16, 2000 at 12:00 am

Are Chocolate Addicts On To Something?

New research finds that chocolate can help prevent clogged arteries. As if on cue, the Center for Science in the Public Interest's Michael Jacobson, known for baselessly raving against anything that tastes good, blasts promotion of the newfound benefits.
Posted February 15, 2000 at 12:00 am

Marketing Via Addicts

Malcolm Walker's "Iceland" English supermarket chain is marking "salt awareness day" today with a press release stating they have removed some salt from their food products. Walker is a major funder and member of Greenpeace, whose steady stream of junk science has helped instill unfounded fear in the public. Is it possible that "Iceland" supermarkets are marketing a fear of salt, which, in turn, they hope to profit from, rather than providing a useful public service?
Posted February 11, 2000 at 12:00 am

Dietary Guidelines Met With Derision

The Washington Post article on America's new dietary guidelines quotes lots of nannies, including the Center for Science in the Public Interest's Margo Wooton and 1999 Nanny of the Year Neal Barnard of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, but no food industry representatives.
Posted February 7, 2000 at 12:00 am