The Mad Cow Scare: Day Six

(December 29th, 2003)
The U.S. Department of Agriculture and other authorities continue to assure us that our meat supply is safe -- and it appears that Americans believe them. Cheeseburger sales at fast-food restaurants seem unaffected. But if there's a chance for scaremongering about the American meat supply,...

Light the Charcoal!

(July 4th, 2003)
July 4th is traditionally the summer's best time for a barbecue. On one of the biggest beef consumption days of the year, we are happy to say that the North American mad-cow scare of 2003 is most likely over. This despite the antics of anti-consumer lunatics like those...
If you're among the millions of Americans whose summer plans include a sandy beach and a wild work of fiction, we recommend taking along mad-cow disease selections from New Scientist magazine, The New York Times, or the Great Falls Tribune. Or perhaps your tastes run more toward...
True to form, the animal-rights nuts at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals have wasted no time in taking advantage of Tuesday's Canadian mad-cow announcement. This morning's Calgary Herald reports:
An internationally known animal rights group will be distributing "emergency vegetarian starter kits" outside an Edmonton grocery...

Mad Cow Scare 2003

(May 21st, 2003)
Yesterday's announcement that a single animal in Canada had tested positive for mad cow disease (technically, "Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy," or BSE) was handled with a surprisingly level head by most agriculture officials and news media. The nation's food-scare activists, however, are gearing up for yet another...

Mad cow? What mad cow?

(March 3rd, 2003)
As we've been telling you for the past two years, the mad-cow-disease "epidemic" promised by anti-meat and organic-agriculture scaremongers was based on activist hype, not sound science. But you don't have to take our word for it.

Britain's National CJD Surveillance Unit, the official government body...

The epidemic that never was

(December 10th, 2002)
British public health consultant George Venters has an interesting take on the worldwide human health panic whipped up over “mad cows” and “mad deer.” Venters calls it “terrifying a population to keep interest going in a rare disease.”

This and other viewpoints were recently shared in a London Times...

Mad cows? No problem.

(November 19th, 2002)
It appears that Great Britain has finally gotten a clue. Today’s Scotsman reports that “the chances of a sheep developing a BSE- type disease under normal farming conditions are, on any base of present knowledge, nil.”

That same editorial also notes that...
In places including Wisconsin, Colorado, Canada, and Louisiana, activists like the Center for Media and Democracy’s John Stauber have been scaring the public (especially hunters) with “mad deer disease” tall tales worthy of any ghost-story session. But it looks like the media, a variety of...
In the years since social activists started trying to convince Americans that the British mad-cow-disease problem would be here soon, science has been catching up with the scaremongers.

The European Union has found that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE -- the scientific name for “mad cow”) can’t...